Tag: Markus Bengtsson

Something nice from one of our supporters Junkyard featuring some of our Scandi favorites like Simon Kallkvist, Victor Larsson Blé, Simon Hallberg & Markus Bengtsson.

Press play and enjoy!

2 weeks ago in Copenhagen, we celebrated the launch of Rowan Zorilla’s well-deserved pro model shoe “The Rowan Pro”. We first presented you with the Dutch version of the weartest but today you get the Nordic one.

Video & Photography by Markus Bengtsson.

Thanks to Vans for the support.

Vans actually invited some people from their European team to join in on the fun. People like Jordan Thackeray came in and joined people like Simon Hallberg, Samuel Norgren & Victor Larsson Blé in testing the shoe.

Some “Off The Wall” Trickery!
Sizing…Check!
Shop Dudes… Check!
Jordan Thackeray Blasting One… Check!
Crailslide by Herkko Karjalainen… Check!
Samuel Norgren test if the shoe works on & off the wall… Check!
And a classic Backside Smith to close things off…Check Please!

After his famed Place video part Poetic’s own Simon Källkvist has now moved over to NYC’s Quartersnacks so he can put that one under his belt.

He also changed shoe sponsors from the big C to a big N but his love for the game has remained the same and we love him for it. Go and watch Simon’s part now!

We are just going to say this if you don’t fuck with Victor – Gidos Larsson Blé we have to question your taste in skating.

Besides that, we have to give a lot of credit to one of the hardest working filmers in Europe right now Markus Bengtsson.

Featuring:

Jonathan Carelle Victor, Gidos Larsson Blé Vilbur, Fritzon Michael, Kaba Josef Norgren, Anders Löwbeer, David Dahlqvist

Another instant classic by our homies from Sweden. Poetic Collective’s very own Samuel Norgren & Johan Bergljung are in the mix feat. PC’s boss man Tom Botwid.

We guess that it must be the time off work that motivated both Simon and Victor but it is impressive to see 3 Scandinavians, 1 spot and 3 days of skating turn into an amazing result.

Accidentally, our friend and photographer Conny Mirbach was present at the famed Prague plaza to witness this destruction and he has since proclaimed that Junkyard’s own Victor is now one of his favorite skaters.

The piece was created by lensman Makke Bengtsson who is actually one of the nicest people ever.

Anyway, if you are not convinced see for yourself what 72 hours of skating Stalin Square can amount to.

EPSON012

“You say it best when you say nothing at all!”

Ronan Keating.

The obvious things can be said but pressing play will provide you with all the answers.

Our friends from Poetic Collective are presenting their second episode of “Triptych” and it is a good example of how to build a brand and keep the corporate identity. Poetic Collective is here to stay and it is different from all the other brands. Good job everybody!

Good things come in three’s so it is no surprise that Tom Botwid and his squad are doing a Triptych.

What is a Triptych? It is basically art slang for a painting made out of three pieces. These type of paintings historically relate to religion and are often seen in churches.

Religious works of art were made to tell biblical stories to people that could not read or write. Now we don’t want to accuse anybody of being analphabetic but we would like to argue that the images in this edit speak to us as skaters.

Enjoy.

What do you do when you have a team filled with talent are located in a country with “real” winter weather for multiple months and are located in a relatively small city?

You create an indoor skatepark for the locals and invite your team to come and rip it. That is basically what happened when Junkyard opened their JunkPark in Trollhättan, Sweden.

We are sure the locals will have a lot of good times there this winter.

I first met Simon many years ago when he was just a little kid, he was always in the corner skating flat ground, doing every flat trick in the most worn down gear. Ever since those days he has grown up and has become a man.  He still loves flat ground but he has taken some of those early low impact moves down obstacles or into slides. One thing that hasn’t changed though, he still somehow always manages to have the most worn down gear, a spectacular feat since Converse supplies him with shoes and Poetic provides him with plenty clothes and boards to wear and wear down. 
Watching Simon skate has always been a treat, his style is very spontaneous, he seems to constantly operate on the limit, just barely hanging on. Mr. Källkvist is not one to stay in his comfort zone he is always pushing himself, falling down and getting up with a smile on his face! I had a chance to talk to both Simon and Markus who filmed this. Enjoy!

Interview by Tom Botwid.
Photos by Viktor Annerstål.
Editing and Filming by Markus Bengtsson.

Simon Källkvist

How was the process of filming for this part? Did it “just happen” or did you create a concept?
Markus Bengtsson released a lot of Stockholm videos during this summer, one of which featured my friend Olle Kling who managed to film a full part in like 3 days, nuts!
After he released that part Markus and I started talking about doing a short film type of part.
That didn’t end up happening. We thought we would work on it for around seven days but it ended up being 3 months.
The whole thing sort of grew organically, it evolved into a longer project. We wanted to film it in downtown Stockholm to really show it for the capital that it is. Even though it’s a relatively small capital city when compared to a town like Paris it still has spots that feel like they could be in a really big metropolitan city.

Viktor Annerstål(1)

Why did you opt for the VX, instead of HD, or even a phone it seems that a Sony VX is not the most user-friendly option nowadays.
First off,  the Sony VX for me is still the best tool to document skating. It is like you can feel what it is like to skate when you watch VX footage. I don’t really get that same feeling when I watch things in HD. Maybe it is because I grew up watching VX filmed videos and that gives me the feeling it is the “right” way to capture skateboarding. Secondly, I like to have a project to work on. It keeps me motivated to push my boundaries and it is fun to go skate spots that maybe you wouldn’t if you weren’t filming.
Filming a full part is something I do for myself like skateboarding is supposed to be!
I don’t dislike Instagram, I watch it almost every day and it keeps me occupied but there is no commitment when I do. I am not engaged in it like I would be when I am watching a full part on a bigger screen. The difference being that I chose to actively watch that video instead of it popping up. Instagram is for quick fun,  unfocused likes, a quick ego boost, but most of the times it keeps me occupied when I don’t want to wash my dishes or study. I feel like I might get a lot of hate for that one!

What does skating for Poetic Collective mean to you?
Poetic helps me, supports me and keeps me pushing myself and that to me is very motivating. They bring new point-of-views into skateboarding. It is hard for me to truly describe what the company means to me. It does keep on changing, but I love all of the people involved it is one big family!

Your skating takes me back to the early 2000s, does this era represent anything special to you?
I like the fact that videos weren’t being put out on a daily basis, it made you appreciate what you have a lot more.
The daily video releases have pushed the level of skateboarding though – monkey sees monkey do – but it also overstimulates me. It was a more simplistic time and I feel like pros skated for themselves and not for the perceived fame and fortune.  It could also just be the fact that everything is filmed with a VX and that is what actually makes me love it!

simon ss heel fs k by Viktor Annerstål

Markus Bengtsson

So, Markus, you spend a lot of time documenting Stockholm can you describe the skate scene for us?
Stockholm is expanding continuously, new spots get built daily, but the one thing our city misses is a proper meet-up spot. Which is not ideal during the summer months. In the winter though everybody meets up at the only indoor skatepark that we have so that is good about those cold couple of months. Overall I think Stockholm is a great city to skate with a lot of outdoor parks and a plethora of street spots.

Can you take us behind the scenes of the filming for this part, how did it come about?
I was plagued by a knee injury this year so I couldn’t skate myself, instead of sitting at home I chose to film so I could still go on missions with my friends. That is how this project got started. I wanted this part to represent a raw and dirty type of skating in Stockholm.

Why do you still film VX, instead of just filming with your phone and putting it on Instagram?
Both me and Simon think that the lifespan of an internet part is longer. Instagram posts are awesome but sometimes you can just scroll past a video without really paying attention to what’s going on. But when you watch somebody’s section on the internet you usually pay more attention to the skating. You actively choose to sit down and watch a part.

You have a military background, does that help you in any way when it comes to filming?
I’ve never really thought about a connection between the two. But I guess you could say that it helps me with the mental part of filming. It allows me to always keep a positive attitude, even when I am really tired. I am able to cope and hide those factors and stick it out. When suddenly the skater makes the trick it is always worth it.

Describe Simon’s skating to us?
The way he skates is inspiring. When you watch him do tricks you can really tell that he is in love with his board. He never sticks to one particular element of skating, he tries to skate everything and does it all with passion. He is not a perfectionist but still, he manages to make everything look smooth. Even the sketchy tricks (laughs).

Viktor Annerstål(2)

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