Tag: barcelona

Earlier this year we were pleasantly surprised by a video called 93FRAMES – EPISODE 1. A loving portrait of one of the rougher areas in France. The video showed the spots, the skaters, and most importantly the people of that area. It was obviously made with the type of attention to detail that two people that live and breathe in that area themselves would poses.

Macéo Moreau was one of those two architects of that video. He is the main guy behind this new video that we are premiering today. But this project is not so much about an area it is more like a tour video. But it is still about a group of people, traveling and skating together. Which in 2020 was one of the things most of us missed the most.

Differences aside, what remains throughout both projects, is that same loving feeling that was so present in the the first episode of 93FRAMES. So, without wasting any more words, we ask you to press play and enjoy vx TOLON.

Leon Charo-Tite is our next “Unsigned Hype” and he is from Freiburg/Germany and that part of his heritage can be an issue. Many have gotten stamped and sidelined as the “German Skater”. To our U.S. audience, that’s kind of like being stamped Canadian or Brazillian in the early 2000’s. Not all Germans suffered this fate obviously, Jan Kliewer, Michi Mackrodt, Sami Harithi to name a few have escaped this treatment. And let’s be fair it is a bullshit stamp. Leon is also Kenyan and once he found out that David Jakinda is also of Kenyan heritage he got very excited and asked if I could introduce him but Covid happened. Still, these kinds of things are important to Leon. Imagine a double part between the two of them! 2021, David were you at? Anyway, Felix Schubert and Leon did the work! while being the two most humble, relaxed, and kind people you could work with. I haven’t heard any bad words about the two of them ever and you know as well as I do that people love to hate (the comments after this will be the true judge of that statement). But through this process they remained hungry, hard working and with good results. You will be seeing a lot more from them after this moment. Mark my words.

All photos by Conny Mirbach.
Film & Edit by Felix Schubert.
Interview by Roland Hoogwater.

I want the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. First question, how are you guys feeling right now?

L: Great!

F: Nervous, I want to know what people think of the video.

Are you afraid that people won’t like the video?

L: I am pretty confident with the stuff we got and I am happy with the way the edit came together. At some point, I was thinking that people would think it was lame or that it wasn’t good enough. But I think it turned out pretty well.

F: I am happy too, but I am curious what the comments will be. 

I think it will be fine, you are young and coming into your prime. So, how did you guys get to know each other?

L: It was here in Berlin, a friend of mine from down south in Germany had moved up here and he introduced me to Felix. I think we skated that park in Moabit together. We clicked and started filming clips. That was in 2018.

F: Nope, that was 2019, you moved in January. 

L: We filmed that “Obstsalat” video in a few months, that happened fast.

F: I’m more introverted and usually need some time to open up to people but with Leon I clicked from the beginning. I had the feeling with Leon I just can talk about everything. That’s what makes working on projects with him so easy.

Leon, you moved here from the South of Germany close to Freiburg and the Swiss border. Berlin has its very own vibe, how was it to make that change?

L: It changed me a lot. Down there we have cool parks, cool spots and I went to Basel a lot. Basel is cool, the scene is great but things are a bit sleepy there at the same time. I wanted to move to Basel but it is really hard for German people to move down there. The Swiss want to keep the circle tight (laughs). I felt a bit stuck, and last minute I thought about Berlin, some of my friends had moved before me. So in the last 3 weeks of 2018, I managed to pack my stuff, rent a car, one way, and arrived in Berlin. It has been a bit over 1.5 years now and time in Berlin moves fast!

You established yourself fast as well.

L: Berlin just has a lot of people and a lot of the right people for me!

F: I guess your skating helped too. (laughs)

Are you from Berlin, Felix?

F: I moved up from Koblenz about 5 years ago to do my vocational training. I stuck to my friends at first but I found myself hanging out with a crew of people from the Freiburg area quite soon. People like Domi & Michi welcomed me in. 

Dominik is a ripper, I didn’t know that about him.

L: They are from Offenburg, the next city over. I know him from back in the day. Him and his little brother were the contest rippers. His little brother always won the kids division. Domi was exciting to watch, when it was contest season I always got excited like “Here comes that nice Back Smith on the hubba.”

You guys live together now, how did that happen?

F: It was kinda random, I had a friend living with me and he built a bunk bed in the hallway. So after Leon lost his flat, I told him he could move into our hallway (laughs). So after a while one of the rooms became available and he moved in there and that is our current status. 

L: It is at Frankfurter Allee really close to the famous stair that people skate. 

Did you ever kick people out or throw down eggs if the skaters didn’t want to leave?

L: (laughs) Not as much as the people living right above it. I also never skated the spot myself, I think I am too heavy to go up like that.

They kept that on the low for sure (laughs). Felix back to you when did you start filming?

F: Well, me and the hometown crew put the money together to buy a camera. Soon I noticed that I was filming better than they were and I wanted the footage to look good so I took on the role of filmer. We dropped a full length in 2016 after 4-years of filming (laughs). 

You can get hooked on filming and editing quite easily. And I think filming motivates people to do their best tricks and I like that. I think I became a filmer because I was interested in showing people that were better than me. I just felt like I wanted to show those peoples skating.

“Obstsalat” is actually the first video I fully did on my own. I guess I just kept filming stuff when I moved to Berlin, without having a project in mind, but when I got to know Michi, I was so stoked about his skating that I figured it’s about time to make my own videos with the guys I like to see skate.

People are at a higher level here. I remember going to one of the skateparks here and just looking around like?! It seems like every cities local hero is just ripping up the park. How did you deal with that coming here, Leon? 

L: What shocked me more than seeing some of the skaters that I had seen before in videos is the fact that their ripping looked so casual in real life. I remember going to Skatehalle for the first time and I felt like “What!! Is this a demo or something?”

So I adjusted and thought like “Ok this seems to be the level, let’s see if I can play. Not in a competitive way but I just wanted to see if I could hang. 

I definitely saw a “Before & After” effect. Because when we first met at the Kindle Banks I was impressed but after the 2019/2020 winter there was a difference.

F: There was, but even back when we filmed Obstsalat he would always get like one or two good clips each session.

L: I got better except for my wheelie skills, wheelies get me depressed. I want to do them but I don’t know how.

It seems like you just take it to bigger spots and transition more naturally. 

L: I don’t even skate transition for that long, I started 3 years ago and I just started learning transition faster than I did any other type of skating. I was into it because it is fast, you can grind long and you go high and because it came naturally to me I stuck with it.

That is kind of crazy because it really seems like you have that level of confidence that comes with growing up on transition. When we did that “Eat Your Veggies” you skated that ramp with ease.

L: That ramp is sketchy but I have this idea that helps me with transition skating. So, on higher ramps, I feel like the basic calculation of the quarter is kind of the same. So whether it is a high ramp or a small one you just need to figure out how to land in the middle of the transition and you can walk or slide out of a bail easily. Also, I look at cats and how they do things and try to emulate that (laughs). 

To be honest it kind of shocked me to hear that you have been skating transition for only 3 years and did an ender like that. Could you share a little bit about that process?

That day was crazy, we woke up had breakfast and we just said let’s go to Kreuzberg and we happened to pass the spot. We looked at each other and thought, why not go here. So I warmed up with those Frontside Oski’s, then did a stall on the top to drop in and after that, I wanted to Nose pick. But I landed in a Noseblunt a couple of times and I kind of started believing it might be possible. So I kept going, had a blackout moment and woke up rolling away from it like “What The Fuck”.

How many tries did it take total?

F: Maybe 20, that was before we even met up with the crew. We kept skating and got more clips that day.

L: I filmed that ollie up, Front board fakie line like right after. You can tell in my part I wear a lot of the same outfits because a lot of stuff happened in sequence.

What was the biggest challenge for this part?

L & F: THE MUSIC!

L: We tried everything, from funk, soul, whatever, and we would come home and try to edit it, and either it didn’t work or we got less psyched after we saw the results. Also, the trick selection was hard, we struggled a bit with that. 

F: I am happy that a lot of things got leftover and that will go forward to my next project.

Continuing, did you guys carefully select the spots you wanted to skate? Because some of these spots are not typical berlin spots.

F: I am just not interested in filming the same old spots, I am not interested in filming too many lines at Bänke. Berlin has so much to offer and looking for spots by bike is a big part of that experience. 

L: I remember Felix would come into my room really stoked saying that he had found a spot on google maps. We would then go there on the weekend and use the spot as a Geiger meter. On the way, we would find things and skate them. That was probably the most productive method for us, sometimes being too prepared and stuck on the idea of doing a certain trick at a certain spot can be detrimental to being productive. I feel if you keep an open mind you approach the spot differently and you often get a better result.

Who is the leader when it comes to picking directions.

L: It is a group thing but Felix knows a lot of spots.

F: And Leon can skate a lot of them so the combination really works.

Except, you never seemed to land at any wheelie pads.

L: (laughs) No he never brought me to any of those luckily.

F: He doesn’t like to try them and I don’t like capturing them on my vx.

What is your personal top 3 when it comes to things in this part.

  1. L: Halfcab down the stairs Wallie Frontside 180.
  2. L: Switch 270 Wallride over the coffin.
  3. L: A toss-up between the line with the Max Palmer Ollie and the Backside Noseblunt.
  1. F: The Ollie at Görlitzer park into the short bank. I like how it looks on tape.
  2. F: The Wallie transfer from stone to stone in Schöneberg. Also not the most common spot.
  3. F: The Ollie over the rail into the bank and dropdown into the next bank. 

Funnily enough, there is a lot of Barcelona in there and I remember that after seeing that footage calling you (Leon) and saying that I felt you could do better.

L: Pfffff, I was scared after you said that, I had an “Aaah I don’t know if I am good enough!” type of moment. At the same time, I did have some tricks to hold on to. I felt like some tricks had a good level and all I had to do was get slightly better than that and I felt that motivated me to get better day after day.

F: I was surprised. But I also felt that you said it to keep Leon motivated and not chill too much. Because we all know those tricks were good tricks. 

My goal with that was to get you to keep the same newfound confidence you had inside of the park and I wanted you to take that to the streets. I mean some of those Barcelona tricks are in the ender section of the video but I felt like all-round the possibilities were greater. 

F: It worked because most of the footage we got happened in the weeks after our Barcelona trip. We also had a lot of time because of the lockdown.

L: I think we never felt that we could sit and chill with the footy we had, I always felt like we should keep it going.

Even after you did the Backside Noseblunt and showed me the clip? my reaction was pretty reassuring.

F: (laughs) I remember you instantly took out your phone and texted Daniel (Pannemann). And he texted back “Damn @streetquarter on a street quarter.”

Looking back you tried some gnarly stuff in Barcelona too. You tried that big kink rail.

L: That was crazy, you had to gap over a 3 stair, into a flatbar, that changes into a 10 stair rail. 

F: You had it though!

L: Almost, I think if I could go back I would try it again. That could have been the ender. I know I can do it though!

Felix’s first full length video, Obstsalat.

Compared to “Obstsalat” you don’t have too many rail tricks in your part. This feels like a part where you shifted focus.

L: You think? Maybe that’s true but at the same time, there weren’t too many good rails around.

Instead of that you just did gnarly drop-ins instead. How many boards did that one under the Prinzenbrücke (bridge) take you?

L: It took like three tries and it didn’t cost a board. I thought I was going to eat shit though! That little slappy wedge at the bottom was scary but I was trying to be mentally prepared for it.

It was the same day as the DDR museum line where I broke the sign. The whole museum area was closed so we could skate some spots that are normally hard to hit. Did anyone ever hit you guys up after seeing something like that and wanted to get the information of the skater?

No, Not really, I received an e-mail once about our stickers being found somewhere but nothing came of it. Random question but what about the frontside flip over the rail? How did that happen?

L: That is in Potsdam, I went there and skated with Justin Sommer and Jose was there as well and we just tried to skate the rail. I tried to Backside Smith it and the rail kept catching my kingpin so I just tried to Reynolds it instead. I got lucky in the end and managed to roll away.

The other line with the Max Palmer Ollie was also in Potsdam but not on the same day.

F: You had learned the Max Palmer Ollie that day. And I made you do it twice because I didn’t like the filming on the first one.

L: I was like, NOOOO PLEASE! (laughs).

In a way, that line is important because it shows you something quite different from the rest of the footage.

L: It was to pay homage to one of my favorite skaters Max Palmer. That guy has it figured out.

I think your part feels a bit more Ishod, to be honest. Except for the fact that you don’t have any ledge lines.

L: I get that a lot. As far as the ledge lines go I will leave those to Pascal Moellaert.

What do you like to see in other people’s parts?

L: I think it is important to stay true to yourself. A lot of parts want to convince you of their quality by going gnarly but in my opinion that only really works if the skater feels like he wants to do it. Like Hyun’s part, you can tell that he skates the way he wants and likes to skate. Or even Shin Sanbongi’s /// part, a lot of people could do a lot of those tricks but you can see that they are true to themselves.

F: I like to see that the skater had ideas and thought about the way he wanted to skate for the part and what he wanted to skate.

L: And in a way, you can’t train street skating. The spot forces you to make choices or it allows you to create combinations that are almost exclusive to the spot.

Brazilians have a special place in skateboarding. It’s been tough at times but now in 2020 it has probably been the best it has ever been. If you need to know one thing about Brazilians is that they are passionate, hard-working & most of all humble people. Hugo hit us up asking if we could help him show his friends and included was an immediate invitation to Barcelona and the promise of a good time. Who doesn’t love that? We respect it and truth be told one thing we forgot to mention is that Brazilians are always good for some bangers! So, read more about Hugo and his friends below or press play straight away.

Intro By Roland Hoogwater.

Text & Photos By Hugo Blender.

We came to Barcelona in April 2019 with a big pack of Brazilians… and at the time I didn’t have a camera and we just spent some weeks only skating for fun, enjoying the city.

But once I bought the camera I started to film my friends who normally don’t have an opportunity to film. I wanted to show them and I did. The whole process was really cool and made possible because Daniel Galli helped me buy the camera.

Hugo with said camera, (self-portrait).

Galli helped me use the camera and he joined in on some of our sessions. Together we went exploring the city looking for some spots.

In the end, for the name, we settled on Apolo because that was the dance club we going to every Thursday and Saturday in Barcelona. All these film sessions if they resulted in tricks ended up with us going there to dance.

So here it is all my friends doing their best just moments before we went dancing again (laughs. Enjoy!

The whole crew put up their 1€ only to see Giovanni pocket their cash first try! When asked if the crew was bummed he took their money Hugo answered: “No we went to barbeque afterward and he put the money back in the pot!” That seems like a good return on investment to us!

We have been told about this project a few months ago and seeing that it finally came together is amazing. Joseph Biais has been on top of the European scene for so long but he always kept it his secret. Here’s another Romain Batard concept film instant classic.

Remember a couple of weeks back we had this interview with Craig Jackson? If you do, then you might remember him mentioning something about the Theobalds Cap Co. going to Barcelona. Well, that moment has passed, the votes are in, and counted. Turns out when it all said and done Craig did not find his experience as Team Manager that easy. A lack of motivation, no food, no drinks, too much sun, or no sun at all, grounds for a skater not to skate or influence the spirit of the group. Being that Craig is a great person he was willing to list his 12 most crucial tips so that you don’t have to learn the hard way.

Intro Roland Hoogwater
Text Craig Jackson
All photos by Rafski

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In Barcelona, distractions and curveballs are everywhere, especially when you’re managing a group of skaters all with different personalities and habits. Highlights included being wet at some point at least three of the five days, losing riders on nights out, boards being snapped unnecessarily, The Kino stack breakfasts and Damm Lemons amongst everything else that stopped us from being at a skate spot before 14:00 hours every day. With that being said it was impressive watching these guys switch into tour mode and handle the many places we took them to as well as ones we would stumble across during our treks around the city.

I learnt a lot whilst playing this role for a week and thought it might be a good idea to take this time to produce a simple 12 step guide for anyone who might own and operate an up and coming brand who are about to embark on trip to ensure you maximise your experience and avoid any unnecessary hurdles. The team sheet consisted of Jake Bidmead, Josh Arnott, Jeremy Jones and Cam Barr who’s this was his first trip to Barcelona (You can only imagine how this went down) and were cheered on by our good friends Josh Brown and Phil Russell. Special shout out to Rafski for putting up with us all week, Amy Ram and Danny Wainwright for the grip tape and keeping everyone pumped. Now scroll down to learn how to “Team Manage” on a shoestring budget…

#1 – Get them on the plane.

Probably the scariest part of the whole trip. Ensure that no one has anything on them that they shouldn’t or anything that could raise a cause for concern. “What’s wrong with that?” was one of our riders response when I clocked that he was going to try and take his tobacco through in small clear baggy. I have no idea why.

#2 – Bring product.

One of our riders forgot all his Theos products. Luckily for me, I pre-packed a ton of stuff, so this did not turn into a problem. Anything that was left over was given out to the many friends we made along the way.

#3 –  S.U.N.C.R.E.A.M rules everything around me.

Jeremy was the only rider who packed some sun cream (his complexion demands him to). But we only found out the need for it when we were all the way out at the infamous beer banks spot. Luckily this also turned out to be the hottest day of the trip. Regardless of any UV damage, Jake threw down this backside nose blunt while we all stood around and got toasted, nicely toasted.

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Jake Bidmead, Backside Noseblunt.

#4 – Be the weatherman.

If you’ve been skating for long enough, you become pretty good at judging the weather. On one of our days, it turned out we only had a window of 3 hours of dryness in between the torrential rain. So, be spot savvy and don’t trek super far if you feel like the weather could easily change on you. When the weather started to turn, I ended up guiding the guys to this super fun bank spot around a lamp post that I first saw Vaughan Baker skate in “Lost & Found” years ago.

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Josh Arnott, Nollie Backside Heel.

#5 – Don’t be afraid to break up the jam.

This rule was one of the hardest for me to come to terms with. The thought that I’d have to tell someone to “not roll that up here, wait for the next spot” didn’t do my anxiety any favours whatsoever. Regardless, we had to keep moving and not get too lost in the sauce. Time is money.

#6 – The best things happen when you least expect it.

In a city like Barcelona, it is easy to forget that almost every place has spot potential, not just the official destinations. I.e. Cam spotting this considerable road gap which had a perfect downhill in front of it that guaranteed extra speed. “READY!?” was the last thing he screamed before flying over the gap. I felt like I was watching nitro circus. Love it! MVP.

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Cam Barr, Ollie.

#7 – Don’t be afraid to give your riders shit.

On one of the days, we were lucky enough to have Danny Wainwright come out with us for the day as guest TM. This was an eye-opener for sure. Danny and Josh Arnott go way back and that was noticeable in their communique. He pretty much gave Josh shit and called him a wussy at every skate spot he went to. He finally gave in and proceeded to half cab over a barrier into one of the crustiest banks I’ve seen.

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Josh Arnott, Half Cab.

#8 – Everyone’s different.

Jeremy Jones is a pretty quiet guy (until he hits the sauce) and compared to others, doesn’t show when he’s frustrated. Remember that everyone is different and sometimes you’ll have to check in and make sure that your guys aren’t burning themselves out at the first spot of the day. Jeremy had to battle for this photo in the heat of the midday sun, but he had his sunscreen on and eventually nailed one perfectly.

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Jeremy Jones, Wallride Nollie, Bank To Bank.

#9 – A team captain helps.

I’ve known Jake for a fair few years now (we partied pretty hard in Monolos when we properly met back in 2012) and since he’s the oldest person on the team, it was only natural that he assumed the team captain role. Jake knows the city like the back of his hand, so after one session was over, we’d catch 5 minutes to discuss where we’d be going next and who could hit certain spots. Jake also talks in his sleep. Cute.

#10 – The media crew will keep you sane.

Always the first texts you will wake up to every morning, your photographer and/or filmer will be your best friend on tour. I was lucky enough to have one of my favourite skate photographers Rafski join us. He kept us all on our toes throughout the trip making sure everyone was out of bed and at Macba in time every day. You’re the best, Rafski.

#11 – Party time, excellent.

Team nights out are essential, don’t be that guy who tries to keep everyone reigned in, let them live. One night we got chased out of Macba by police and ended up at Nevermind. Everyone got pretty ‘lit’, Cam snapped his board, and we lost Jeremy who I luckily found talking to one of those sketchy beer seller guys near our hostel several hours later. I managed to eventually pull him away and put him to bed, reluctantly.

#12 – Get them back on the plane

Maybe even scarier that step 1, ensure that everyone gets on that plane back home. Drag them out of bed if you need too. One last final bit of advice: Make sure everyone has budgeted enough money for that airport transfer…

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Jake Bidmead, Frontside Crooked Grind to Fakie.

To start off I really like Butter Goods, I like the product, the team, and their video output but I don’t really like Barcelona footage anymore.

Why might you ask? I have seen it too much ever since the days of És Menikmati BCN has dominated skateboarding in Europe and I am oversaturated.

Basically, what tipped the scales to positive for me was the Ghostface Killah track, Tony Starks is indeed my favorite MC and a very underrated one at that. Also, Cappadonna always reminds me of that amazing Petr Horvat part.

Written by Roland Hoogwater

Each visual presentation is a benchmark for any skate company, the skating, the skaters, the music, the filming and the editing all have a strong effect on the way people percept a brand. The HY Skate Bag guys took expert filmer and editor Yoan Taillandier to the place that skaters dream of during the night and the day.

Photos by Clement Chouleur

Have you ever tried to stand in wheelie position for an entire Raekwon song and do you want to know what that looks like? Watch this video!

Our favorite rapper and Asi Pack member Tightill made us aware of this timeless video compilation in the same week that he blessed us with a new album. We suggest you watch the tape and then listen to some RnB Anarchie!

Most of these images could have made it into our current issue, that is a fact. It takes a certain idea, a vibe, a setting and the right people to make a good article. It also strongly depends on the taste of the person working on a specific article direction. Person “A” might like a bit more Heitor Da Silva (who wouldn’t?), Person “B” might prefer some more grandpa’s (elderly Spanish people have the best style!) or simply a second Budgetbeuker portrait (he is a pretty one isn’t he?). Since we have other articles and a limited number of pages, we don’t want to have to leave some stuff on the drawing board just to watch them expire.

Enjoy another episode of Kaffeezigarette!

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Welcome to Barcelona and welcome to our house. It’s a simple house but it has a room that’s all your own. It has a shower, a TV set, a kitchen with pots and pans and most importantly, it has “us”– other people in it. Now I don’t know if you…. the person reading this, are still living with your parents or if you recently bought your first house, but I do know that all of the above and in between know the feeling of coming into a new place. A house filled with people you don’t really know. If you’re lucky, there might be some facial recognition here and there. Upon entry, you shake hands, state your name, try to remember theirs and ask for the Wi-Fi password. You do all of this with the goal of dropping your bags and getting to your room so you can lie down for a minute and process everything. Now for some of you, the alarm bells might have started ringing. You know the feeling, you know the drill, but if for some reason you can’t remember the feeling, let me help you refresh your memory. It is the same feeling you get when you go to summer camp.

This film is featuring: Marcus Shaw, Filip Almqvist, Phillip Oehmige, Pekka Løvås, Heitor Da Silva, Daniel Spängs & Martin Sandberg.

Filmed and edited by Peter Buikema.

One time ÉS Game of skate winner and legendary Cologne skater Patrick Bös just hit the internet with his newest part and truth be told it features some of his best footage to date (that last line was particularly great).

We also feel that respect must be given to the fact that Herr Bös still manages to put out good parts at a somewhat later skate age combined with a serious job as a teacher.
At the same time, we like the fact that he is an outspoken person that has been around the block and has seen trends come and go.

We suggest you give his part a watch and then read his blog

“How does it feel to be so well connected that you can go to any location in the world and be at home?”

Those were the opening words of our feature about Sara Parson-Texas and like we said in that feature Sara is still just “right around the corner”, surrounded by her friends and family.

So being that she is the family type, we started thinking and that culminated into one night at the infamous Black Lodge Bar where we asked Sara if she would like to be a member of a new family, our family and she did, she joined with a hug and a big smile!

So without further ado, we present to you the first column created by one of our favorite people Sara Parson Texas!

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For the people that don’t speak French:

A.M.V.H – Alfred de Musset

In this world, we must love many things
To know, in the end, what one loves best,
Candy, the Ocean, gambling, the azure of the skies,
Women, horses, laurels and roses.

We must trample barely bloomed flowers;
We must cry a lot, say a lot of farewells
Then the heart perceives that it has become old,
And the effect that goes away reveals to us the causes.

Of these fleeting possessions, only half tasted,
The best that remains is an old friend:
We quarrel, we avoid each other. Chance brings us back together.
We come close, we smile, the hand touches the hand,
And we remember that we used to walk together, That the soul is immortal, and yesterday is tomorrow.

A while ago I posted the first clip of Sports Class, which was really nice and made me already curious about what to expect next. Now in Fresh Beer Cold Beer the team travels trough more or less the three of Europe’s well-known skate metropolises: London, Prague and Barcelona. And especially kind of brings back memories of a time when Prague’s Stalin Plaza was the place to be in Europe.

Featuring Tom Snape, Toby Locke, Goeff Campbell and more.

It is no secret that Alex Ullmann is a good skater right? If it was a secret his cover has now been blown. We have been out skating with Alex on more than one occasion and he is the type that gets something at every spot… Ok so now that we did the sweet talk, we can tell you that Alex can also be the strong silent type, he has a wallflower type of quality without actually being one. We thought it would be nice to launch his new part in conjunction with a little questionnaire so you, me and everybody can get to know a bit more about Mr. Ullmann.

Hey, Alex let’s start this thing… Where have you been?

One second ago?

I just started eating my freshly fried pasta with pesto.

…one minute ago?

I was staying in the kitchen preparing my meal.

…one hour ago? 

I was at a tutoring class for business accounting. I force myself to go there two times a week because in May I have my final exam. By then I have to see trough this.

…one day ago?

My roommates and I cleaned up the apartment. It was really necessary. After that my girlfriend Nina and I went billposting on cruisers in Marburg. It’s a good secondary income. 

…one week ago? 

I had to work till 3 o’clock p.m. and afterwards I met up with Iwan (Martaller) and David (Perez) at the indoor skate park in Giessen. We had a few beers while we were replacing the old stair set with a bank – so you can ride the straight rail from the left side now, too. It’s really awesome!

…one month ago?

On New Year’s Eve, I had a small party with my roomies. We just hung out playing some board games and went downtown for some beers later on.

…one year ago?

I have been to Spain for the most legendary tour ever – The Hell Ride. Paul Zenner, Fabian Lang, Maxi Schaible, Niklas Speer von Kappeln, Mario Ungerer, Dominik Schneider, Leo Preisinger and myself we rented a minibus and drove all the way from Almeria to Lisbon. Unfortunately, I had to fly back home 2 days earlier for my midterm exams, so I missed skating in Lisbon. But it still was one a one-of-a-kind trip.

…five years ago? 

After my volunteer social year, I started working at a community for handicapped people for two years, which was a really interesting and valuable experience that lastingly shaped me.

…ten years ago?

I was living at home with my family in Echzell and after school, I always went skating with my homies Sven, Steffen, Henne, Matthias and Felix at the local funbox. 

…15 years ago?
 
I moved from Wölfersheim to Echzell with my mom and three sisters. Three years later I started skating after always seeing some skaters while grocery shopping with my mom. Some day I just went there with my board and waited for them to show up. We hung out ever since.

…20 years ago?

At that point, I was five years old and living with my family in Wölfersheim where I also went to preschool.

…25 years ago?

25 years ago on the 12 February 1991, I was born in Bad Nauheim. It was an uncomplicated singleton breech pregnancy.

Enjoy Alex’s new Barcelona Vacation Part!

Portrait by Danny Sommerfeld

Danish Danni Olsen got himself a pretty nice present for his 30th birthday. One of the first full parts of ’17 is coming from a former Berlin resident and Iriedaily, Mischief Skateboards and Search & Destroy Skateshop team rider; with a big heart and die ability to drink more than the Franken bar has to offer.