Tag: Friedjof Feye

To be honest, when somebody asks you who your favorite skater is you always think about the pro’s. In my case, Brian Anderson would be the most likely answer you would get back.

But if we are really are being honest, your friends are your favorite skaters, the difference being that you don’t get the joy of waiting for their parts because you are out on those missions getting some awkward BGP’s, guest tricks and hugs in for the edit. Right?

After the Lynchian man in white passes Nils catches a flash and put together this backside lipslide shove-it.

Well, when we caught wind that my friends Nils & Daniel started working on this project together, I said:

“Don’t tell me any tricks you did, and don’t ask me to come along for the filming missions.”

Roland Hoogwater, early 2019.
The nickname “The Mule” belongs to a famous pro skater but at times it sure fits Mr. Brauer.

I wanted to have the joy of watching my favorite skaters part exactly when it dropped. And so it happened*, they went out to Hannover, Budapest, Croatia, Lissabon, Potsdam & Israel and made this project a reality and I stayed at my post and did my own thing patiently waiting until today.

When all of a sudden I got a message…rushed over to Free’s website and did like you are about to…Press play! And after that simply wait 2 more years for part 2 to show up.

Remember that Killa Cam’ron song “U’ WASN’T THERE”? Well we actually were here and this is pretty fucking hard.

All photos by Biemer.

Text by Roland Hoogwater.

*I actually cheated the one rule and got some guest tricks.

From the company that brought you Roller Aaller 3 now comes CLEPDOCHEHNIX. Much has changed during the time between these two videos but the spirit has remained the same!

Featuring:

Benjamin Vogel, Tjark Thielker, Daniel Meyer, Jan Hoffmann, Niklas Speer von Cappeln, Mike Brauer, Dennis Laaß, Lennie Burmeister, Lars Zimmermann, Friedjof Feye, Christoph Friedmann, David Marlo Conrads & our favorite rapper Tightill!

Detroit is a city in the state of Michigan, which is a place in the midwest of the United States. At one point in time, a lot of cars were being built there, hence the name “Motor City”. After the decline of the motor industry, the city emptied out but somehow the music scene remained. Just google “Detroit Musicians” and take a moment to scroll through one of the most defining lists of musicians you’ll ever come across. Stevie Wonder, J Dilla, Theo Parrish, Aaliyah, George Clinton, and Eminem just to name a few. The City has some kind of rhythm to it and our friends from Berlin, Hanover & San Francisco felt a lust to bust some moves.

All Photos by Friedjof Feye Text by Roland Hoogwater & Daniel Pannemann.

HarrisonHafner-bstailslide-Detroit-neu

Harrison Hafner is the smart guy, he brought his tools and made sure that nothing would hold him back skating a spot. We can all be proud of Harry that he’s still skating with all the dirt he has stuck in his eyeballs, after all these years of having very dirty hands. BS Tailslide in quite the muddy situation.

NilsBrauer-bs50-50-Detroit

Nils Brauer would never leave the house without his first-aid-kit and the car you see behind the yellow rail would drive immediately to the next hospital in case of an emergency. Shortly after he landed this BS Fifty he got his full body disinfected by a nurse that was coincidentally at the scene. Tragically, she forgot one important thing and to this day, Nils is still struggling with serious side effects of touching the fence with that one hand that didn’t get the cleaning treatment. Get well soon, Buddy.

AlexOdenahoe-feeble-Detroit

Alex O’Donahoe is a weird name but then again he is a weird guy. But in a very good way. He believes in conspiracy theories and eats quite a lot of Spaghetti. He regrets grinding that bench and actually going for the BS Feeble Grind wasn’t such a good idea either, “It’s just a lot of information for the government to have against me..” – he said.  If you count all the windows of that building behind Ayo and do the analogy to the 9/11 case you might get some answers that will totally leave you shocked.

TjarkThielker-bsnosebluntslide-Detroit-neu

Tjark Thielker didn’t come to Detroit to break Fidi’s fucking fisheye. And he didn’t. But he also didn’t come to Detroit to skate. He was just trying to find some really cheap furniture to ship back to Berlin and he did find some cool things. Unfortunately for him, his partner Dominik couldn’t pick up the phone and they never arranged any of those shippings.

Get the NEW ISSUE 62 to see more about the “Mom’s Spaghetti” tour.

Little did we know, Copenhagen is one step closer to paradise. We just got back from CPH Pro’17, and for the most of us, it was actually the very first time. While we were on our way to the capital with the world famous mermaid and probably the biggest and coolest contest in the world, we got a call from Henning Tapper (Cleptomanicx TM) asking if we would be interested in releasing their latest tour article. The answer was clear, although we did not even saw the video or any of those photos. It’s a trust thing and if you know that Niklas Speer von Cappeln, Jan Hoffman, Tjark Thielker, Benjamin Vogel and Dennis Laass went on a trip to a huge skate park that looks like Copenhagen, you better put all your trust in it. At this point, we do not even have to start to explain how crazy the architecture is. Watching the video, those guys did not even go to all the famous spots. Having David Lindberg as a spot guide and filmer was definitely helpful as well, but the rest was the pure power of having a smart community with very open minded people and no fear of including all the different urban subculture genre; instead of leaving us alone and building “stop skateboarding” signs. Copenhagen does it the right way and so did the Cleptomanicx team with this film.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Jan Hoffmann with a FS 180° fakie Nose-wheelie Flip out. Yeah, it’s not a skate park.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Dennis and Tjark; looking for options, we presume.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Even while playing baskteball Dennis would not leave his board alone. The Team plus TM.

All photos by Friedjof Feye.

It is the truth that not all skateboarders are dumb, they are also not necessarily lazy. But one thing is certain: the larger the group of skaters, the lazier it gets. That is how it went with the “Basta!” crew.
14 years ago a bunch of passionate skaters hailing from the same boggy area called Niedersachsen. That group decided to give themselves a name, so that they grow together as a team and release a video at the same time. After the first video dropped (2004) and made its waves in the Boardstein Magazine (R.I.P.), the crew got the idea to create an even better video and that was the start of the Myth surrounding the “Basta! Video”.

Text by Basta!’s own Carsten (Barney) Beneker.
Translation by Place.

bast5

In the (particularly the German) scene this project rates somewhere between Mythical and Comical. Since the release of the first project, the second one has long been “in progress” or “to be released soon” and to be honest it took about ten years to get this project from the mind to the streets and the editing room floor to this post, which will finalize the project. Many people gave up hope of ever seeing this project reach a final stage. Finally, it has to be said that external influences gave our ten headed group the final push into out of a turtle like movement and into the finalization of the project.

bast2

The slow movement of our group.

The following thought model helps to illustrate the inertia in the Basta! clan: Take ten skateboarders that just started a multiple of new life challenges. Divide them from each other as far a possible within or outside the borders of the Bundesrepublik Germany. And try to create and cultivate even the slightest’s drop of team spirit, general motivation or vision between these ten people. To make sure that it does not become too easy, you are allowed only outdated means of communication, analog film equipment and poses neither the budget nor the technical expertise to work with above-mentioned tools, finally one can only act once a consensus about a decision has been reached. I mean the idea is to make a good quality video, should be easy enough right? I get kind of tense just thinking about it. Our previous experience indicates the result: Extremely slow decision-making and a truly absurd email history. The answers to the proverbial, differentiated emails are most popular, messages such as: “Hey let’s just finish the Basta!-video” or “well…, making some sticker would be cool”.
What kind of results can one expect in these type of conditions: The result? People who are hopelessly in love with their project thus they try to push their vision until things give in after ten years. In the end, the planned “skate video”, transforms into a documentation of one’s own coming of age.

bastaaaa

Providence

There were some moments, moments in which everything seemed so easy and attainable. Like in 2009, when out of the blue we produced a great four-minute video for a video contest hosted by The Berrics. Or should we talk about that one night that the entire crew decided to book a flight, rent a van and an apartment to go and skate Cyprus together? A little while later we were standing in a place called Limassol which had such an abundance of good spots that we just could not believe our eyes. On the tail end of that trip, almost the whole Basta!-crew actually managed to visit the New York – Big Apple.
Maybe if certain people did not leak their footy during that time for their own commercial gain, we could have had an even greater presentation ready for you sooner. The challenge of doing our own edits was bypassed by these actions until finally our dear friend Jonathan Peters took a gamble and said: “It would be an honor for me to be able to edit the Basta!- video”.

basta3

It only took two years from the time that Mr. Peters ushered that statement to an actual final, final version of the video that all ten of the members could live with. After we completed this step we went on the next one which was organizing a premiere in Hannover’s favorite DIY festival 2er on Fire (2016). Since last Christmas, only 50 DVDs, Booklets, and hand pressed DVD covers were produced and now finally five months later, our baby will hit the internet. But, only because the staff over at PLACE asked us! And because we switched from a consensus type of voting style to a veto style of voting we could almost keep up with the internet’s demands.

Our Future

Our average age has now moved from our 20’s into our 30’s so the wine is getting finer and the cheese is not yet moldy. We still feel like we can surpass this video! And if we can’t, our offsprings will have to complete the video for us.

basta future

Thank you’s go out to:
We are many people who received a lot of support from a lot of different sides. Thus we owe a lot of people our gratitude, especially Jonathan Peters and Friedjof Feye because they certainly helped push the project forward. Also, we would like to that the staff of PLACE Magazine for their help.

bast4

Photos taken from the Basta! booklet.

13

Today at 6pm we will show you exclusively Jan Hoffmann’s new full part and to say the least, it is quite a heavy one. Before that you get the first look at Jan’s Pro Board for Robotron Skateboards and Cleptomanicx now, by showing you the snapshot recap of his surprise party at the Attitude Skateshop in Bremen last weekend. Jan got his shirt, the board of course and a first video premiere, surrounded by all his loved ones. All Photos by Friedjof Feye. Make sure to come back at 6pm ;).

In the last week of July we decided to make a trip to Montreal, Canada. Our good friends Friedjof Feye and Jonathan Peters have been out there for already three weeks when we got to the city on the east coast. I have pictured it way different, maybe because I always had a very romantic image in my head, when i thought about Northern American cities. But actually, in the end, we always ended up in the industrial part of the city. And those areas always have had the most romantic look to it and so does the industrial architecture in Canada. Especially on a Sunday. When no one is around and it seems like a ghost town. On the other side, the Downtown part of the city is comparable with any other major city in Canada, the USA or even Australia. Allthough, it is more peaceful! But we already decided to have a look around the outskirts of Canada’s second biggest town. With a group of around five guys we were wandering the empty streets and I think each one of us was documenting in a quite different way. Fidi was using a Olympus Mju 1 and his Fuji 200 – Here’s a few snap shots:

Daniel-Treppe-Montreal

DanielRoland-Brücke-Montreal

Danny-downhill-Montreal

Last week PLACE issue 58 landed in the mail. Tradition says when an issue is done it is time to host a party. This time it had to be Amsterdam. And that was our gut feeling talking. Trust your gut, people! So, when the time came, we linked up with the people from POP Trading Company & G’s to set the right atmosphere, it all turned out well and it was a great evening.

Special Thanks to Levi’s Skateboarding Collection.

All photos by Friedjof Feye & Daniel Pannemann.

The Clepto guys ventured out into the country to skate some spots that they would not normally skate, instead of only going to some big German cities they searched for spots in other (possibly greener) pastures. Escaping the fast pace of the city but risking the wrath of some small town people that did not want to see their peace and quiet taken away from them by some skateboarders. In the end, things seemed to have turned out for the best and they got some pretty nice moves on camera.

Photo by Friedjof Feye

Tjark Thielker is a professional skateboarder who’s passionate about what he does. He definitely knows how the game works, and he’s playing his own role in it. But if “professional” means that he earns enough money to make a living, we might have to rethink that term…

We know for a fact that there is only a handful of Germans who actually make a living out of skateboarding. Tjark does get a lot of support from his sponsors, and yet being a sponsored skater is not enough to make ends meet in his case – although he’s been sponsored for about 10 years by now. “In a good relationship with a company you could get sponsored for at least 15 years I think, maybe even longer,” Tjark says.

Skateboarding can make you feel quite worn-out every now and then. Either you win or you lose. There is no insurance company that’s willing to pay in case you’re not landing tricks. “If I didn’t skate, I would probably already have my degree, a lot more brain cells left and maybe even some more hair left on my head.” But let’s be honest, skateboarding opens up your horizon in many ways. No way Tjark would have seen places like Kyrgyzstan, San Francisco, NYC, or all the other destinations around Europe in the way he’s experienced them over the last years. “It’s a privilege,” he agrees. “With next to no money in your pocket you can travel all around the world, see different people and learn about their culture,” he enthuses.

TjarkThielker-nocomplytailslide-Hannover
No Comply Tailslide

As corny as it might sound, skateboarding is a choice of lifestyle. People might treat you differently, because they picture you as Bart Simpson or the guy on the cereal box. Although it’s a dog in a clown’s dress with a dorky hat, there are certain stereotypes about us, and people outside of skateboarding are not to be blamed for that. That’s just how society works, and we play our own role in it. “Even though quite a few things in my life have changed over the last five years, skateboarding was always on my mind, no doubt,” he says.

And yet, it’s just not enough to make a living. As a side job he is interested in buying and selling old furniture, records and suitcases. Together with one of his best buddies Dominik he buys things by auction and re-sells them at flea markets or online. Some days, things go really well, but the one time we followed them they were pretty much out of luck. That’s life, I guess. Here is one day with TJ at an auction somewhere on the outskirts of Berlin:

The rack Tjark and Dominik are interested in is lot number 229. It’s about one and a half meters high, and about a meter wide. 120 records, and there might be some real treasures in this pile – hits only! Reason enough for Dominik and Tjark to decide about how high they’re willing to go for this one. It’s still about half an hour until the auction starts. This is not the type of auction were you have to sit on your spot and raise your hand when you see something on stage that you like. This is one where you walk around – but you still raise your hand if you are interested. The storehouse is about the size of a basketball field, filled with racks full of stuff that no one really needs.

TJ

tjark-thielker

It’s totally ridiculous how much money people are willing to spend for this crap. I saw a rack with broken vases, expired apple juice, coffee filter boxes and framed images of strangers, dogs or entire families. Two meters high, four meters deep, for a price of more than 500€…

But back to the records: “Usually most people don’t recognize the value of records over here, so this could be a bargain for us,” Dominik explains while browsing the collection. The smell is comparable to being inside an old church or lost in grandmother’s basement. “It’s interesting how different the people are over here,” Tjark offers while screening the crowd for people who might also be interested in the record rack. It doesn’t take long until Dominik discovers a familiar face: “This guy bought records off of us, maybe he will be interested again.” Unfortunately, the man is interested in the whole rack.

Tjark_furniture

Tjark found another man who might show interest. “This guy does not know what he bids on. The minute we raise our hand, he goes in,” says Tjark, then adding: “A pretty dislikable person. I really hope he is not interested this time.” He’s wrong though. The man is interested in the rack, probably because of Tjark’s and Dominik’s looks. Seems like he just sensed it somehow. Before you can join an auction you need to sign up first to get a registration number and a little ID-card to show.

The whole rack starts at 80€. Not willing to pay more than two Euros per record, Tjark and Dominik agree to stop at a price of 250€ for the whole thing. Everything happens really quickly, and all the bidders seem to be aware of that. “The moron saw that we’re interested, and that was the only reason he made a bid on the records.” The moron eventually buys the rack for a price of 540€ plus 20% auction tax. It all went down in less than two minutes, and I actually had a hard time keeping track of the situation. “Usually this would have never happened, we were just unlucky that he noticed we’re interested,” Dominik tells me.

Tjark2

After a little break with homemade potato salad for 3,50€ the whole group moves on to the next room – the furniture room. Everything you could wish for, marked with a little scratch or a crack here and there, but nothing too bad. Some of the guys have already seated themselves on some of those couches, desks or chairs, just to make sure they will bid as far as they need to. To my mind, this does not really make sense from an economic perspective, but what do I know? Reverse psychology, maybe?

Tjark and Dominik don’t seem to be too motivated. TJ is taking notes in his iPhone about some of the items. Number of item, starting bid, and how high they are willing to go. “To call it a day right now would be wasting time, and there is more to it than just the biddings,” Tjark says. He’s got the feeling that there is at least a little something left for them. A chair and a coffee table for 20€, for example.

TjarkThielker-ollie-Hannover
Ollie

“This couple makes about 90€ if we take care of it,” Tjark replies with a little smile on his face. “At least something,” adds Dominik. Last bid of the day is on a roll-front cabinet with no keys to it. Apart from TJ, one young woman seems to be interested, but for some reason she also seems to be in a really bad mood. “I think she doesn’t like us at all, she must have seen us here before.” Tjark got lucky once again for a price of 90€. In total, they spent about 110€ on furniture. “Next time we just need to invest more money to make a better profit,” Dominik speculates. Turns out he was right: A week later, TJ and Dominik got lucky by investing a higher amount of money.

Words: Daniel Pannemann
Photos: Friedjof Feye (b&w) & Danny Sommerfeld (auction)

Friedjof Feye ist einer der passioniertesten Skateboard Fotografen im norddeutschen Raum und verkauft seine Bilder schon seit längerem weit über die Landesgrenzen hinaus. Skateboard Fotografie kann ganz schön undankbar sein. Nicht aber wenn man selbst den Spot skatet, welcher im Verlauf der Session abgelichtet wird. Vielleicht ist das einer der Gründe, wieso der Wahl-Hannoveraner ein ziemlich geschultes Auge zeigt. Friedjof springt selbst gerne an die Wand bevor er Andere in seinen meist analogen Rahmen setzt. Wir haben uns über seine neue Seite, Instagram und Inspiration unterhalten. Das Foto oben zeigt Friedjof beim FS Wallride vor einigen Wochen in San Francisco, fotografiert von Alex Denkiewicz.

Du bist ja schon etwas länger dabei. Warum erst jetzt der Schritt zur eigenen Website?

Ich habe lange mit mir gerungen. Es lag zum einen daran, dass es mir bei meinen eigenen Bildern an Vielfalt und Qualität gemangelt hat, zum anderen habe ich es nicht als notwendig erachtet. Diese Zweifel habe ich mittlerweile überwiegend ablegen können, weil ich mich einerseits fotografisch weiterentwickeln konnte, andererseits habe ich die Internetseite als Gelegenheit gesehen, meine eigenen Vorstellungen hinsichtlich Layout, Bilderauswahl, etc. umzusetzen.

tjarkthielker-wallietailgrab-berlinxs1
Tjark Thielker, Wallie Tailgrab Berlin.

Du selbst hast keinen Instagram Account. Wie stehst du generell zu medialem Output über solche Kanäle?

Im Allgemeinen habe ich eine zwiegespaltene Meinung zum Thema „social network“. Zur Selbstvermarktung für Sportler, Künstler u.s.w. wirkt es auf den ersten Blick genial, wobei mir der Nutzen für private Unternehmungen, familiäre Angelegenheiten o.ä. nie ersichtlich wurde. Mich stört vor allem, dass der Nutzer sich daran gewöhnt, jederzeit gratis auf Bilder -und damit dem Eigentum anderer- zugreifen zu können. Instagram-Fotos erhalten somit nur eine verhältnismäßig geringe Wertschätzung, weil sie sich so gesehen selbst uninteressant machen. Ausnahmen bestätigen natürlich die Regel und wer sich im Internet nach der Devise „Klasse statt Masse“ verhält, wird auch als Fotograf oder skater die entsprechende Anerkennung bekommen.

Verfolgst du es denn trotzdem?

Ich sehe nur äußerst selten Beiträge via Instagram. Meistens über das smartphone eines Freundes. Ich kann durchaus verstehen, dass es interessant sein mag, aber wie bereits oben erwähnt, ist es nicht wirklich meine Welt.

Danny-Cracker-bochumxs
Danny Sommerfeld und Cracker in Bochum.

Was wird man auf deiner Seite finden können und was für Projekte stehen in der Zukunft an?

Zunächst werde ich den Blog meiner Seite für Neuigkeiten nutzen. Darüber hinaus werde ich ab und zu Veränderungen in den einzelnen Rubriken vornehmen. Generell werden auf meiner Seite nur Bilder zu sehen sein, die bereits gedruckt worden sind.
In der nahen Zukunft werde ich mich mit einer Reihe von Projekten beschäftigen, die überwiegend hohen Bezug zu Skateboarding haben. Auch aus San Francisco, wo ich diesen Monat war, wird man noch etwas zu sehen bekommen.

Du fotografierst selten Leute, die du überhaupt nicht kennst. Wie kommt das?

Fotografie ist für mich ja eher Freizeit als Beruf und in meiner Freizeit verbringe ich eben viel Zeit mit skatenden Freunden. Meistens sind es also Freunde, die ich fotografiere. Wenn noch andere Leute dabei sind und vielleicht sogar ein Bild entsteht, finde ich das natürlich super. In der Regel sind die klassischen „Skater-Fotograf-Verabredungen“ aber eher nicht mein Fall. Es widerstrebt meiner persönlichen Auffassung von skaten.

Nils-Brauer-Bluntslide-Valenciaxs
Nils Brauer, BS Bluntslide Valencia.

Zu welchen Leuten schaust du auf? Skateboard Fotografie und generelle Inspiration.

Generell beeindrucken mich Fotografen, die sich leidenschaftlich und diszipliniert mit dem Handwerk beschäftigen, denen kein Weg zu weit ist und kein Aufwand zu groß. Es sind Fotografen, die nicht immer die erstbeste Perspektive am offensichtlichsten Ort wählen und auch mal über ihren eigenen Schatten springen, um etwas Neues ausprobieren. Was Skateboarding betrifft, haben mich anfangs stark die Bilder von Zander Taketomo und Hendrik Herzmann inspiriert. Heute sind noch viele andere Inspirationsquellen, auch abseits der Skatefotografie, hinzugekommen.

Noch viel mehr Fotos findest du auf Feye-Photography.com.

lennie-burmeister-frischhaltefolie-preview

Inspiriert von Helge Tscharns „Crossprocessed“-Arbeit, begab sich Friedjof Feye in die Heimatstädte unserer Legenden des deutschen Skateboardings. Zunächst einmal soll die Technik ein wenig erläutert werden, denn heutzutage könnte man doch fast meinen, dass der Look der Scans womöglich dem Instagram-Filter „Valencia“ geschuldet sei. Viel komplizierter: Geschossen wurden die Bilder auf abgelaufenen Fuji Sensia 400 oder Provia 400 Dia-Filmen und anschließend im wiederum normalen C41-Verfahren entwickelt. Man spricht von der Umkehrentwicklung eines Farbnegativfilms, wobei das Filmmaterial in seinem gegenteiligen Entwicklungsprozess entwickelt wird.

Passend zur relativ alten Technik und dem längst vergessenen Farbtrend, konnte Friedjof einige unserer immer noch sehr trendigen und aktiven Skateboard-„Großväter“ vor die Linse bekommen, die dann noch einmal an ihrem Heimat-Spot performen mussten. Intern konnten wir nach dem Eintreffen der Fotos in der Redaktion auch einige Highlights der Jungs Revue passieren lassen, zum Beispiel Oliver Tielsch SW Flip Backtail am Wassertorplatz, welcher auch heute noch ein absoluter Curtain Closer wäre.

Wann warst du zum ersten Mal an dem Spot?
1989, würde ich tippen.

Wie hat sich Skateboarding in deiner Heimatstadt (deiner persönlichen Skateboard-Heimat) verändert?
Der Spot wurde vor einigen Jahren umgebaut und hat dadurch viel Potential verloren. Ende der Achtziger gab es – passend zum damaligen Skate-Style – diverse Jumpramps; in den Neunzigern und frühen Nullerjahren skateten wir die Stufen, Fahrradständer, Mülltonnen und verschiedenen Holzbänke und Rails. Die Rails und vor allem die Holzbänke gibt es nicht mehr.

Vor allem sie konnte man immer wieder neu arrangieren, umgeklappt als Flatrail skaten, drüber springen und so weiter; es gab diverse selbstgebaute Picknicktische (sogar einen nach den eigenhändig von Stefan Lehnert übermittelten original Lockwood-Maßen!). Ab und an wurden Platten hochgehebelt und zu Love-Park-esken Bumps präpariert und so weiter… schön war’s! Seit dem Umbau des Platzes hat sich dessen Grundfläche enorm verkleinert. Auch die Atmosphäre ist eine andere, da einige Bäume und Büsche samt dem darin liegenden traditionellen Chill-Spot der neuen Straßenführung weichen mussten.

Geskatet wird am Rathaus trotzdem noch reichlich, jedoch wünsche ich mir inzwischen – bei jedem Heimatbesuch ein bisschen mehr – einen anständigen Skatepark für Göttingen, und es ist mir ein Rätsel, warum sich in dieser Richtung rein gar nichts bewegt…!

Wo siehst du deutsches Skateboarding im europäischen Vergleich?
Sehr schwierige Frage. Manchmal denke ich, dass die guten Skater hier nicht so zur Geltung kommen wie anderswo oder vielleicht auch zu wenig aus sich machen… mag aber auch subjektive Wahrnehmung sein. Abgesehen davon, ist das ein Thema, dass sich schwer in zwei Sätzen abhandeln lässt!

Nur so viel: Am Skaten hat mich schon immer die besondere Magie begeistert, das Unerwartete, der plötzliche Funke. Weniger die auswendig gelernten Extrem-Stunts vom Fließband; nichts Erzwungenes, nichts Aufgesetztes. Ob all das in Deutschland zu kurz kommt oder anderswo mehr Beachtung bekommt, kann ich nicht beurteilen.

Wer sind deine deutschen „Lieblingsskater“, damals und heute?
Früher: Auf jeden Fall Jan Waage. Später setzte Mehmet Aydins Monster-Interview einen Meilenstein. Mit Lennie zusammen zu skaten war immer Inspiration. Stefan Lehnerts „Farewell“-Interview hat mich gestoked. 

Heute: Michi Mackrodt neigt zwar zur Hektik und kann auch kein Tischtennis spielen, aber seine Line-Choreos lassen Detlef D! Soost sicher vor Neid erblassen, und Hasenheide-Sessions mit ihm sind eine Offenbarung! Bänke-Sessions mit Christopher Schübel werden nie langweilig. Über den MK1-Part von Hannes Schilling hab ich mich gefreut sowie über jede zufällige Session mit ihm. Pop und Power von Jungs wie Louis Taubert und diesem Daniel Pannemann faszinieren mich immer wieder – was braucht man mehr…?
 
Deine persönliche „Golden Era“ der gesamten Karriere?
1996: Mouse! Welcome to Hell! Eastern Exposure 3! FTC Penal Code 101A! 
Skateboarding: „real“ (wenn man diesen ziemlich inflationären Begriff gebrauchen darf) und in der „Nische“. 
Und: Rathaus at its best!

Wie lange wird man noch mit dir rechnen können?
Och, so lange Skateboarding Spaß macht. Noch kein Ende in Sicht. 

Mehr Hometown Heroes

Inspiriert von Helge Tscharns „Crossprocessed“-Arbeit, begab sich Friedjof Feye in die Heimatstädte unserer Legenden des deutschen Skateboardings. Zunächst einmal soll die Technik ein wenig erläutert werden, denn heutzutage könnte man doch fast meinen, dass der Look der Scans womöglich dem Instagram-Filter „Valencia“ geschuldet sei. Viel komplizierter: Geschossen wurden die Bilder auf abgelaufenen Fuji Sensia 400 oder Provia 400 Dia-Filmen und anschließend im wiederum normalen C41-Verfahren entwickelt. Man spricht von der Umkehrentwicklung eines Farbnegativfilms, wobei das Filmmaterial in seinem gegenteiligen Entwicklungsprozess entwickelt wird.

Passend zur relativ alten Technik und dem längst vergessenen Farbtrend, konnte Friedjof einige unserer immer noch sehr trendigen und aktiven Skateboard-„Großväter“ vor die Linse bekommen, die dann noch einmal an ihrem Heimat-Spot performen mussten. Intern konnten wir nach dem Eintreffen der Fotos in der Redaktion auch einige Highlights der Jungs Revue passieren lassen, zum Beispiel Oliver Tielsch SW Flip Backtail am Wassertorplatz, welcher auch heute noch ein absoluter Curtain Closer wäre.

Wann warst du zum ersten Mal an dem Spot?
Das erste Mal mit dem Skateboard an der Domplatte war ich schätzungsweise 1995; wir sind damals mit unserer Crew mindestens einmal im Monat mit dem Wochenendticket und allem Erstparten nach Köln gefahren. Erst das neueste 411 und so viel Stuff besorgt, wie es das Portemonnaie hergab, dann an der Domplatte geskatet, bis der letzte Zug ging. Die Curbs erschienen uns damals utopisch hart und wir haben uns vor allem damit beschäftigt, über die dunkel abgesetzten Bodenplatten zu springen und Flat-Tricks zu lernen. 

Wie hat sich Skateboarding in deiner Heimatstadt (deiner persönlichen Skateboard-Heimat) verändert?
Seit 1995 hat es sich massiv verändert, da Skateboarding in Köln damals komplett um den Dom zentriert war, mit Ausnahme der North Brigade vielleicht. Man fuhr einfach immer ohne groß nachzudenken zum Dom und die Homies waren schon da. Es gab alles, was man brauchte, Curbs in allen Höhen, die 4er, die 7er, die 8er, die Phila und da wir eine ziemlich große Crew waren und auch viel Leute von außerhalb kamen, gingen immer großartige Sessions. Fast jeden Tag ist etwas lustiges oder absurdes passiert, wir waren also ganz schön verwöhnt. Als dann nach langem Hin und Her die Curbs 2007 von der Stadt eingefräst wurden, war der Platz von ein auf den anderen Tag so gut wie unskatebar.

Wir sind dann auf die Barrikaden gegangen, haben den Dom Skateboarding e.V. gegründet und haben vom vorübergehenden DIY Spot bis hin zu inzwischen mehreren Skateparks in Köln alles rausgeholt, was ging. Aber inzwischen kann man nicht mehr von der Hand weisen, dass Skateboarding in Köln hauptsächlich in Skateparks stattfindet und nicht mehr auf der Strasse. Das ist wohl die größte Veränderung. Abgesehen davon haben wir zum Glück eine sehr vitale und vielseitige Szene hier, durch die vielen Möglichkeiten wahrscheinlich vielseitiger als je zuvor.

Wo siehst du deutsches Skateboarding im europäischen Vergleich?
Ich denke, dass wir ziemlich gut dabei sind. Natürlich prägt Pontus von Malmö aus momentan die ganze Welt in gewisser Weise, und wir haben auch keine Company wie Cliché, die sich international darstellt, aber wir haben viele Talente und interessante Charaktere und müssen uns sicher nicht verstecken. Danny Sommerfeld, Willow, Lem, Denny, Chris Pfanner, um nur ein paar zu nennen, die sicher weit über unsere Landesgrenzen bekannt sind. Ich muss hier aber auch direkt an ein Interview mit Jan Kliewer denken, wo er meinte, viele jüngere Skater sind nicht so offen, fahren nicht einfach auf gut Glück irgendwohin, crashen Couches und machen internationale Connections, so wie er es damals gemacht hat. Ich denke, da können sich die Jüngeren einiges von den Engländern und Franzosen abschneiden, die ziemlich gut darin sind, sich weltweit zu vernetzen. Aber es kommen gerade wieder so viele junge Talente an den Start, die werden hoffentlich ihre Chancen zu nutzen wissen!

Wer sind deine deutschen „Lieblingsskater“, damals und heute?
Damals gab es einige, die Favoriten waren ganz klar Sami Harithi und Jan Kliewer. Als Jan mit Flip Backside Nosebluntslides in Göttingen am Rathaus um die Ecke kam, konnte ich es erst mal nicht fassen. In Köln waren Chris Weinlechner und Sebi Vellrath für mich immer ganz vorne dabei. Heute hab ich in dem Sinne keine Lieblingsskater, aber Daniel Pannemann find ich immer gut, Niklas Speer von Cappeln war für mich von Anfang an ein Ausnahmetalent, Vladik ist mit einem unglaublichen Style und Talent gesegnet, Danny Sommerfeld sowieso. Michi Mackrodt und Günni wären noch zwei Jungs aus meiner Generation, die hier nicht fehlen dürfen.

Deine persönliche „Golden Era“ der gesamten Karriere?
Für mich war natürlich die Zeit nach der Jahrtausendwende die beste, Zivildienst, noch wenig bis keine Verantwortung und den ganzen Tag mit der Crew am Dom verbracht, jeden Tag neue Tricks gelernt und abends mit den Homies losgezogen. Alles war noch neu, die Sponsoren, Interviews mit Helge und Gentsch zu fotografieren war der Hammer und hat mich unglaublich gepusht damals, und die ersten großen Trips haben mich sehr begeistert. Und auch wenn ich der größte Contest-Loser war, haben wir in München, auf dem ESC und wo es uns sonst immer hin verschlagen hat, immer eine großartige Zeit gehabt. Mit zehn Mann in einem Doppelzimmer im Holiday Inn in München beschreibt ziemlich genau, was damals bei uns los war.

Wie lange wird man noch mit dir rechnen können?
Ich bin mit den Jahren sicher privater geworden, was mein Skaten angeht und die Motivation, auf Missions zu gehen hat auch nachgelassen, aber ich skate viel, bin nicht weniger motiviert als früher und hab auch nicht das Gefühl, etwas verlernt zu haben. Insofern, solange meine Sprunggelenke das mitmachen, werde ich dabeibleiben, ich habe kein Ende eingeplant.

Mehr Hometown Heroes

Wir haben Zuwachs bekommen. Der Neue ist da. Und alle sind gespannt, was der Neue so mitbringt. Gut Skateboard fahren kann er, dass ist allseits bekannt. Fotos machen auch – siehe KaffeeZigarette.tumblr.com. Alles schön und gut. Aber wie sieht es aus, wenn man während der Deadline und kurz vor Heft Abgabe immer noch kein Cover hat? Stresssituationen sind sehr nützlich um zu erkennen, wie belastbar der Neue ist. Wir alle kennen diese Situation oder waren sogar schon selbst mal irgendwann und irgendwo der Neue.

Als der Neue stehst du unter einer ständigen Beobachtung, welche sich auch intensiv genau so anfühlt. „Ach, du kannst das gar nicht?“ hört sich als „der Neue“ an wie „Ach, du kannst das gar nicht und wieso bist du überhaupt hier.“ An Stelle von: „Ach du kannst das gar nicht – super, dann zeig ich dir mal wie wir das machen.“ Schwarz/weiss Denken, weil man den Gegenüber einfach noch gar nicht so richtig einschätzen kann. Das kann hin und wieder auch mal unangenehm werden. Danny dagegen trifft bei uns nur auf Sympathien, mal davon abgesehen, dass wir ihn eh alle schon vorher kannten (oder, Skism?).

Als einer der Männer hinter TPDG Supplies zeigt er mit eben dieser Gründung im Jahr 2010, zusammen mit Ben Wessler und Eric Mirbach, dass er sich nicht nur auf seine sportliche Karriere konzentrieren möchte, sondern parallel dazu die Kraft und die Ideen aufbringt, um sich selbst zu verwirklichen. Ein liebevoller Dickkopf mit einem geschulten Auge, der nötigen Erfahrung und dem richtigen Gespür für Ästhetik. Viele Gründe um den gebürtigen Kasselaner im Spätsommer für ein Praktikum einzuladen; die Früchte des Praktikums gibt es in dieser Ausgabe zu ernten. Der Neue konnte sich beweisen und wurde just für längere Zeit verpflichtet. Hallo Danny!

Auch Neu ist die Wiedergeburt der Münchener Szene durch aktive Unterstützer und Macher wie zum Beispiel die Jungs um den S.H.R.N. Skateshop und dessen Gründer und Skateboard Legende Robinson Kuhlmann, welcher in dieser Ausgabe mit einem „Behind The Scenes“ vertereten ist. „Alles neu!“ ist dann wohl Brian Delatorres Motto, der nun völlig nüchtern sein gesamtes Hab und Gut in New York City verkauft, um zurück an die Westküste, genauer gesagt San Francisco, zuziehen, wo es dann in erster Linie darum geht Footage zu sammeln und Liebe zu verbreiten.

Robin Wulf verbucht eine mindestens fünf-stellige Summe auf seinem Karma Konto, während unser Cover Fotograf Conny Mirbach auf einen Spaziergang durch das vermeintlich typisch deutsche München einläd. Zum Ende wird es noch mal richtig modern, denn die inoffizielle #niggazingermany Tour zog durch die Bundesländer, mit unter anderem dem Tourstopp München. Na, merkste was? So, genug mit den Appetizern und ab in die #49. Danny, machst du Kaffee? Und wo überhaupt bleibt mein Fußbad?

by Daniel Pannemann

DannySommerfeld-fsboardslide-berlin(xl)
FS Boardslide by Friedjof Feye

Inspiriert von Helge Tscharns „Crossprocessed“-Arbeit, begab sich Friedjof Feye in die Heimatstädte unserer Legenden des deutschen Skateboardings. Zunächst einmal soll die Technik ein wenig erläutert werden, denn heutzutage könnte man doch fast meinen, dass der Look der Scans womöglich dem Instagram-Filter „Valencia“ geschuldet sei. Viel komplizierter: Geschossen wurden die Bilder auf abgelaufenen Fuji Sensia 400 oder Provia 400 Dia-Filmen und anschließend im wiederum normalen C41-Verfahren entwickelt. Man spricht von der Umkehrentwicklung eines Farbnegativfilms, wobei das Filmmaterial in seinem gegenteiligen Entwicklungsprozess entwickelt wird.

Passend zur relativ alten Technik und dem längst vergessenen Farbtrend, konnte Friedjof einige unserer immer noch sehr trendigen und aktiven Skateboard-„Großväter“ vor die Linse bekommen, die dann noch einmal an ihrem Heimat-Spot performen mussten. Intern konnten wir nach dem Eintreffen der Fotos in der Redaktion auch einige Highlights der Jungs Revue passieren lassen, zum Beispiel Oliver Tielschs SW Flip Backtail am Wassertorplatz, welcher auch heute noch ein absoluter Curtain Closer wäre.

LennieBurmeister-bs tailslide-hannover-preview(xl)

Wann warst du zum ersten Mal an dem Spot?
Das war wahrscheinlich 1994. Damals haben wir (die Skater vom Land) angefangen, die Street-Skate-Szene in Hannover aufzumischen und Dennis Laas hat uns viel gezeigt. Kurze Zeit später hatte ich eine Freundin in Hannover, die direkt anliegend am gezeigten Spot gewohnt hat und dadurch wurde es ein „daily Spot“ für mich. Hinter der Mensa gibt es noch ein 7er Rail, das wir verstärkt geskatet sind und an dem ich wohl die ersten Switch Rail-Tricks in Deutschland überhaupt gemacht habe.Insgesamt wird an den Mensa-Banks wohl schon seit dem Entstehen im Jahr 1981 geskatet. Der Spot ist auch heute noch nicht ausgereizt, wie zum Beispiel Farids FS Blunt Transfer zeigt.

Wie hat sich Skateboarding in deiner Heimatstadt (deiner persönlichen Skateboard-Heimat) verändert?
In Wietzen, dem kleinen Dorf zwischen Hannover und Bremen, in dem auch meine Skatescheune steht, hat sich leider die Szene quasi aufgelöst. Alle Crews, die den Skate-Vibe seit unserem Anfang um 1990 weitergetragen haben, sind langsam aber stetig in die Städte ausgewandert, so dass kaum noch Nachwuchs begeistert werden kann. Obwohl die Scheune noch immer jeden Tag (außer sonntags) und ohne Eintritt genutzt werden könnte. Ich hoffe, dass sich das schnell wieder ändert und die nächste Generation da wieder rockt. Die Rampen sind auf jeden Fall eine Reise wert und top in Schuss – seht selbst:

Wo siehst du deutsches Skateboarding im europäischen Vergleich?
Die deutsche Skateszene hinkt leider schon immer in puncto Style und Output den Engländern und Franzosen hinterher, obwohl Deutschland den größten Euro-Skatemarkt besitzt und es auch sehr viele Skater gibt.
Leider gibt es nur wenig Fahrer, die internationale Beachtung finden, und es gibt nicht eine deutsche Board-Company, die über die Grenzen Deutschlands bekannt ist. Wieso das so ist, kann ich nicht erklären, aber es wird Zeit, dass sich das ändert!

Wer sind deine deutschen „Lieblingsskater“, damals und heute?
Lieblingsskater kommen und gehen mit den Jahren, aber einige sind da für mich schon sehr wichtig. Das sind Leute wie Jan Waage, Sami Harithi, Klaus Dieter Span und Jan Kliewer, die mich persönlich sehr beeinflusst haben, und natürlich all die Jungs, die ich gut kenne und die dann durch die Decke gegangen sind wie Willow, Paco Elles, Tjark Thielker oder Michi Mackrodt und Glenn Michelfelder.
Dann ist da noch eine Riesenliste an Skatern, die mich einfach von ihrer Art zu skaten berühren, z.B. Louis Taubert, Valerie Rosomako, Daniel Pannemann, Patrick Rogalski oder Farid, von denen man noch sehr viel hören wird. 

Deine persönliche „Golden Era“ der gesamten Karriere?
Es klingt etwas seltsam, aber ich kann das wohl zwei Phasen meiner Skatezeit zuordnen: Einerseits die Zeit um 95/96, in der ich sehr große Schritte in meinem Können gemacht habe und vielleicht im Vergleich zur weltweiten Szene sehr weit vorne war, aber leider nie den Schritt ins internationale Game gewagt habe – aber dafür um so mehr Spaß mit den Homies hatte. Und dann die letzten sieben Jahre, in denen ich wieder sehr viel gefahren bin und auch vom Skaten leben konnte. Man wird mit dem Alter zwar etwas ruhiger, was den Stuntfaktor angeht, aber man lernt immer mehr dazu, so dass ich sagen möchte, ich bin heutzutage ein besserer Skater als je zuvor.

Wie lange wird man noch mit dir rechnen können?
Ich finde nicht mehr so viel Zeit wie früher, um Output zu produzieren, da jetzt mein Sohn Milo da ist und ich auch viel mit unserer Company Yamato Living Ramps beschäftigt bin. Aber so schnell werdet ihr mich nicht los und dann werdet ihr hoffentlich auch immer mehr Skateparks (checkt mal Chemnitz aus!) aus meiner Feder fahren.

Mehr Hometown Heroes

Inspiriert von Helge Tscharns „Crossprocessed“-Arbeit, begab sich Friedjof Feye in die Heimatstädte unserer Legenden des deutschen Skateboardings. Zunächst einmal soll die Technik ein wenig erläutert werden, denn heutzutage könnte man doch fast meinen, dass der Look der Scans womöglich dem Instagram-Filter „Valencia“ geschuldet sei. Viel komplizierter: Geschossen wurden die Bilder auf abgelaufenen Fuji Sensia 400 oder Provia 400 Dia-Filmen und anschließend im wiederum normalen C41-Verfahren entwickelt. Man spricht von der Umkehrentwicklung eines Farbnegativfilms, wobei das Filmmaterial in seinem gegenteiligen Entwicklungsprozess entwickelt wird.

Passend zur relativ alten Technik und dem längst vergessenen Farbtrend, konnte Friedjof einige unserer immer noch sehr trendigen und aktiven Skateboard-„Großväter“ vor die Linse bekommen, die dann noch einmal an ihrem Heimat-Spot performen mussten. Intern konnten wir nach dem Eintreffen der Fotos in der Redaktion auch einige Highlights der Jungs Revue passieren lassen, zum Beispiel Oliver Tielsch SW Flip Backtail am Wassertorplatz, welcher auch heute noch ein absoluter Curtain Closer wäre…

richie löffler-hurricane-hamburg preview(xl)
BS Hurricane

Wie hat sich Skateboarding in deiner Heimatstadt (deiner persönlichen Skateboard-Heimat) verändert?
Es gibt mehr Skateparks, mehr Spots und mehr Skater. Zusammen skaten, Party machen und Spaß haben ist an der Tagesordnung. „The song remains the same“, auch wenn leider nicht mehr so viele von meinen alten Homies dabei sind.
 
Wo siehst du deutsches Skateboarding im europäischen Vergleich?
Im Vergleich zu einigen anderen Ländern muss ich leider sagen, dass die Deutschen etwas weniger Spaß beim Skaten haben. Weniger Miteinander. Ich war zum Beispiel gerade wieder in London und da feuern sich die Skater einfach mehr an, selbst wenn du einen Trick nicht schaffst. Ansonsten vom Niveau auf jeden Fall oben mit dabei.
 
Wer sind deine deutschen „Lieblingsskater“, damals und heute?
Damals: Marc Mitzka, Dirk Wehnes, Sami Harithi
Heute: Jürgen Horrwarth, Lem, Michi von Fintel und Michi Mackrodt

Deine persönliche „Golden Era“ der gesamten Karriere?
Ich freue mich über jeden Tag, an dem ich skaten kann, was für ein Geschenk. Ich denke Mitte/Ende der Neunziger war die Zeit, wo sich mein Kopf nur um Skaten gedreht hat.

Wie lange wird man noch mit dir rechnen können?
Solange mein Körper mitmacht, und sollte er mal nicht mehr können, werde ich versuchen, einen Weg zu finden doch noch weiter skaten zu können, hehehe!

Mehr Hometown Heroes

Es ist immer wieder schön zu sehen, wie sich Menschen entwickeln. Im Fall von Wladimir Hoppe gestaltet sich diese Entwicklung getreu dem Motto „höher, schneller, weiter“. Ich kenne kaum jemanden, der mit dir durch die ganze Stadt pusht, kurz vorm Ziel im Vorbeifahren ein großes Handrail überfliegt, um anschließend weiter zu pushen, als wäre nichts gewesen.

Wladi ist zu jemandem geworden, der beim Thema Skateboarding vor Ehrgeiz nur so aufglüht und in dessen Wortschatz ein Ausdruck wie „das Handtuch schmeißen“ gar nicht erst vorkommt. Dennoch ist er in manchen Sachen immer noch der Alte. Wenn am Sonntag alle in den Startlöchern stehen, fällt ihm plötzlich ein, dass er kein Grip für sein neues Board dabeihat oder ihm das Geld für Benzin oder die Eintrittskarte zur Skatehalle fehlt. Aber auch das wird schon! In diesem Sinne, noch mal alles Gute zur Volljährigkeit und Herzlichen Glückwunsch zum ersten PLACE-Auftritt!

Foto: Friedjof Feye
Text: Sebastian Denzin

{title}